Blog
New York Times fashion photographer Bill Cunningham dies at 87

NEW YORK Bill Cunningham, the celebrated New York Times fashion photographer known for his shots of emerging trends on the streets of New York City, died on Saturday at age of 87 after being hospitalized for a stroke.Cunningham worked for the New York Times for nearly 40 years, operating "as a dedicated chronicler of fashion and as an unlikely cultural anthropologist," the newspaper said. His photo spreads were a staple of the paper's Style section and chronicled changing fashion through his choice of themes such as swirling skirts, Birkin bags and gaudy floral prints."A lot of people complain about fashion and fast fashion. There is no fashion. That is baloney. Look at this," he said in a video for a recent spread in the paper on the use of black and white contrasts in clothing.Cunningham took pictures of celebrated New Yorkers at swank events and traveled the city by bicycle for decades, often wearing his signature blue jacket, to shoot street fashion typically using a single-lens reflex camera."He wanted to find subjects, not be the subject. He wanted to observe, rather than be observed. Asceticism was a hallmark of his brand," the newspaper said. Cunningham, who had tried his hand at hat making, was drafted by the U.S. Army during the Korean War. After he got out in 1953, he eventually found work as a fashion reporter.In the mid-1960s he acquired a small camera to help him with his work, and that started him off in fashion photography."I had just the most marvelous time with that camera. Everybody I saw I was able to record," he wrote in the Times in 2002. In 2008, the French government awarded him the Legion d’Honneur for his work. A year later, he was named a Living Landmark by the New York Landmarks Conservancy.Cunningham became known to a wider world through an acclaimed 2010 documentary chronicling his career, in which Vogue Magazine editor Anna Wintour quipped: "We all get dressed for Bill."In an obituary in Vogue, editor-at-large Hamish Bowles wrote "his scrupulous editorial standards of both content and comportment were old world." Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., publisher and chairman of the Times, said Cunningham's "company was sought after by the fashion world's rich and powerful, yet he remained one of the kindest, most gentle and humble people I have ever met."His life was one of austerity. He slept on a single size cot where he lived until 2010 in a studio above Carnegie Hall, chock full of file cabinets containing his negatives.When asked why he spent years ripping up checks for his work from magazines, he said, "Money's the cheapest thing. Liberty and freedom is the most expensive," the Times reported. (Writing by Jon Herskovitz; Editing by Mary Milliken)

Read More
Apple wins dismissal of lawsuit over MacBook logic boards

Apple Inc won the dismissal on Thursday of a lawsuit accusing it of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook laptop computers that contained "logic boards" it knew were defective, and which routinely failed within two years.U.S. District Judge William Alsup in San Francisco said the plaintiffs, Uriel Marcus and Benedict Verceles, failed to show that Apple made "affirmative misrepresentations," despite citing online complaints and Apple marketing statements calling the laptops "state of the art" or the "most advanced" on the market."Plaintiffs have failed to allege that Apple's logic boards were unfit for their ordinary purposes or lacked a minimal level of quality," Alsup wrote. "Both plaintiffs were able to adequately use their computers for approximately 18 months and two years, respectively."Alsup gave the plaintiffs until Jan. 22 to amend their lawsuit, which sought class-action status, against the Cupertino, California-based company. Omar Rosales, a lawyer for the plaintiffs, did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Apple did not immediately respond to a similar request.The plaintiffs claimed that Apple's sale of MacBooks since May 20, 2010, violated consumer protection laws in California and Texas, where the lawsuit began last May before being moved.They also contended that Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook was told about the defective logic boards in 2011, but did nothing. Logic boards contain computer circuitry and are sometimes known as motherboards.A separate and still pending lawsuit in California accuses Apple of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook Pro laptops in 2011 that contained defective graphic cards, causing screen distortions and system failures. MacBooks are part of Apple's Mac line of desktop and laptop computers. The company reported unit sales in that business of 18.91 million in its latest fiscal year.The case is Marcus et al v. Apple Inc, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, No. 14-03824. (Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York. Editing by Andre Grenon)

Read More
Simmons, Ingram expected to go 1-2 in NBA Draft

NEW YORK Ben Simmons and Brandon Ingram are the consensus cream of the crop in Thursday's NBA Draft, making the Philadelphia 76ers and Los Angeles Lakers the likely winners of the night that can shape league futures.The 76ers own the first choice and reports have surfaced that they have settled on Simmons, a 6-foot-10 power forward from Louisiana State University, who can grab a defensive rebound and lead the break with his great passing touch.“He’s got an NBA body and he’s got some skills that are NBA skills, definable NBA skills,” 76ers president of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo said. “When you put that size and skill together, it’s generally a pretty good package.”The Sixers have made a fetish of collecting promising young talent with high draft picks from poor regular season records, but through injuries and a lack of veteran presence on the team have struggled to improve on the court.Philadelphia also hold the 24th and 26th picks of the first round. Selecting second are the Los Angeles Lakers, who begin their post-Kobe Bryant era with the expected selection of Duke University's Ingram, who is a scorer from the small forward position with a good jump shot and strong moves to the hoop.There are a batch of other highly regarded prospects that follow, though they seem a notch below Simmons and Ingram as projected impact players.The next tier of incoming talent include shooting guards Jamal Murray of Kentucky, Buddy Hield of Oklahoma and Jaylen Brown of California. The top point guard from the college ranks is projected to be Kris Dunn of Providence, while highly touted power forwards include Dragan Bender of Israel and Marquese Chriss of Washington.The Boston Celtics, who own eight picks in Thursday’s two-round draft, have the No. 3 overall pick, and may be shopping that selection to add some NBA-ready players. Gonzaga's 6-foot-10 forward Domantas Sabonis, son of former Lithuanian Olympian and NBA star Arvidas Sabonis, is another coveted player.The top center in the draft is likely to be 7-foot-1 Jakob Poeltl of Austria, who was a second-team all-American during his college days at Utah, where he averaged 17.2 points and 9.1 rebounds a game. (Reporting by Larry Fine in New York; Editing by Frank Pingue)

Read More
As gates open in Shanghai, Disney already adding to $5.5 billion park

SHANGHAI Boasting the Magic Kingdom's tallest fairytale castle and longest musical parade, Walt Disney Co's Shanghai park is already its biggest overseas outpost. But even as gates open to the public this week, it's still building to keep customers keen.Disney's largest overseas investment at $5.5 billion, the park is a bet on China's middle class and its booming domestic tourism. The U.S. firm hopes it will offset an otherwise lackluster international theme park business, better known for cash-burning sites like Euro Disney.Calling Shanghai Disney the firm's greatest business opportunity since Walt Disney bought land in the central Florida in the 1960s, the company has been at pains to woo the home crowd in a country where competition from a plethora of local theme parks promises to be fierce.Main Street has been replaced by Mickey Avenue to reduce the feel of Americana while attractions include a Chinese-style Wandering Moon tea house, a Chinese Zodiac-themed garden and a Tarzan musical featuring Chinese acrobats.The park's seven square kilometer plot of land means there is plenty of space to expand, Disney Chief Executive Bob Iger told reporters ahead of the official opening on Thursday. "There is actually construction going on this week. When we open we will continue the construction to expand what's on the opening day menu," he said. "We have plenty of space to do that and we believe we've got willing partners... We think we will probably do that sooner rather than later."Iger, who scouted the Shanghai site in 1999, said China had incredible potential given its size. Disney estimates there are 330 million people within a three hour radius of Shanghai, the country's financial center, who would be able to afford to come to the park. Shanghai Disney could also help lure more consumers to its films. "Zootopia", "Captain America: Civil War", "The Jungle Book" and "Star Wars: the Force Awakens" are among the 10 most-watched movies in China of 2016, reaping more than $690 million in ticket sales, according to Box Office Mojo. Characters from those films will feature at the Shanghai resort.Disney, though, is facing intense competition from billionaire developers building homegrown parks and from domestic cartoon characters. It also faces a deeply ambivalent attitude to its products in China. On one hand, Iger received a presidential welcome from Xi Jinping in May, and Disney has been granted "special" trademark protection. But China's main military newspaper has also warned that "Zootopia", a story about a rabbit police officer in an animal city, was a tool for spreading U.S. propaganda and ideals.Disney is also not set to reap all the rewards. The resort is a joint venture with state-owned Shendi Group, which has a 57 percent stake - a concession agreed during lengthy negotiations.Shendi is a consortium controlled by four large government-owned companies: Shanghai Media Group; hotelier Jin Jiang International, controlled by the city of Shanghai; supermarket-to-department store operator Bailian Group, and property developer Lujiazui Development Group. (Reporting by Adam Jourdan; Editing by Edwina Gibbs)

Read More
Apple wins dismissal of lawsuit over MacBook logic boards

Apple Inc won the dismissal on Thursday of a lawsuit accusing it of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook laptop computers that contained "logic boards" it knew were defective, and which routinely failed within two years.U.S. District Judge William Alsup in San Francisco said the plaintiffs, Uriel Marcus and Benedict Verceles, failed to show that Apple made "affirmative misrepresentations," despite citing online complaints and Apple marketing statements calling the laptops "state of the art" or the "most advanced" on the market."Plaintiffs have failed to allege that Apple's logic boards were unfit for their ordinary purposes or lacked a minimal level of quality," Alsup wrote. "Both plaintiffs were able to adequately use their computers for approximately 18 months and two years, respectively."Alsup gave the plaintiffs until Jan. 22 to amend their lawsuit, which sought class-action status, against the Cupertino, California-based company. Omar Rosales, a lawyer for the plaintiffs, did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Apple did not immediately respond to a similar request.The plaintiffs claimed that Apple's sale of MacBooks since May 20, 2010, violated consumer protection laws in California and Texas, where the lawsuit began last May before being moved.They also contended that Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook was told about the defective logic boards in 2011, but did nothing. Logic boards contain computer circuitry and are sometimes known as motherboards.A separate and still pending lawsuit in California accuses Apple of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook Pro laptops in 2011 that contained defective graphic cards, causing screen distortions and system failures. MacBooks are part of Apple's Mac line of desktop and laptop computers. The company reported unit sales in that business of 18.91 million in its latest fiscal year.The case is Marcus et al v. Apple Inc, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, No. 14-03824. (Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York. Editing by Andre Grenon)

Read More
Older Post